Read Death Comes to Pemberley by P.D. James, awhile back, and while it was well written, personally didn’t care too much for the story line.  In general, I’m not a huge fan of mysteries, but I thought I should read another one of P.D. James’ books to be fair, and I’m glad I did.  Summer reading for me is usually a little bit on the lighter side, and I recently took a few books the majority of them mysteries from a friend who inherited them from a former co-worker. They are all to be registered with Bookcrossing.com and eventually released to other members or through Little Free Libraries or other free book shelves. This was a fast read, and it was fun to read about London and Cambridge in the 1970’s–mini cooper included.

An Unsuitable Job for a Woman was published in 1972, and the lead character Cordelia Gray, has lost her mentor Bernie, and taken over his detective agency when she travels to Cambridge to see about a prospective case.  Actually Jane Austen is mentioned or referenced twice. First up in conversation between the main character Cordelia and her employer’s secretary Miss Leaming —

“When we were traveling here together you were reading Hardy. Do you enjoy him?”

“Very much. But I enjoy Jane Austen more.”

“Then you must try to find an opportunity of visiting the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge.  They have a letter written by Jane Austen. I think you’d find it interesting.”

And later a reference to Pride and Prejudice

“He wasn’t particularly forthcoming but he did assure me that the boy had left voluntarily and to use his own words, his conduct while in college had been almost boringly irreproachable.  I need not fear that the shades of Summertrees would be polluted.”

P.D. James a great mystery writer and Janeite.

 

 

 

 

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