Letter to Cassandra Saturday 1-Sunday 2 December 1798

This letter from Jane Austen writing from Steventon to her older sister Cassandra still away at their brother’s house Godmersham, per the notes, follows another that is missing. Austen begins her letter updating and filling in Cassandra about their brother Frank and his recent correspondence with details of his naval service assignments, also warning that with recent changes–correspondence from Frank may become more difficult: “Frank writes in good spirits, but says that our correspondence cannot be so easily carried on in the future as it has been, as the communication between Cadiz and Lisbon is less frequent than formerly.  You and my mother, therefore, must not alarm yourselves at long intervals that may divide his letters  I address this advice to you two as being the most tender-hearted of the family.”

There is also the requisite updating of Cassandra of their mother, Mrs. Austen’s healthy and ailments: “My mother made her entree into the dressing room through the crowds of admiring spectators yesterday afternoon, and were all drank tea together for the first time these five weeks.”

Adding also that a surgeon (per the notes), Mr. Lyford visited: “Mr. Lyford was here yesterday; he came while we were at dinner, and partook of our elegant entertainment.”

Here I think a good serving of Austen’s wicked wit: “He wants my mother to look yellow and to throw out a rash, but she will do neither.”

Austen then recounts her visits to the Lloyds at their home Deane — updating Cassandra with a tangent as well on how she personally felt about the whole process of pregnancy, child birth and recovery, noting about Mary Lloyd: “Mary does not manage matters in such a way as to make me want to lay in myself.  She is not tidy enough in her appearance; she has no dressing gown to sit up in; her curtains are all too thin, and things are not in that comfort and style about her which are necessary to make such a situation an enviable one.”

Following with a bit of news about the household, their cousin Eliza (that they have no news), and a little update neighborhood news/prospective marriages before delving into hair and wardrobe: “I find great comfort in my stuff gown, but I hope you dod not wear yours too often.  I have made myself two or three caps to wear of evenings since I came home, and they save me a world of torment as to hair-dressing, which at present gives me no trouble beyond washing and brushing, for my long hair is always plaited up out of sight, and my short hair curls well enough to want no papering.”

And back again to her witty relay of neighborhood news and updates, including: “Charles Powlett gave a dance on Thursday, to the great disturbance of all his neighbours, of course, who, you know, take a most lively interest in the state of his finances, and live in hopes of his being soon ruined.”

This follows with an update about a new maid hired at Steventon and on Sunday she adds a section where Mr. Austen sends a little cheeky message about their brother Edward’s pigs, perhaps in the vein of keeping up with the times: “and desires he may be told, as encouragement to his taste for them, that Lord Bolton is particularly curious in his pigs, has had pigstyes of a most elegant construction built for them, and visits them every morning as soon as he rises.”  Per the notes, a reference to Lord Thomas Orde Bolton of Basingstoke.

All notes/cites to: Jane Austen’s Letters, Collected and Edited by Deirdre Le Faye, Fourth Edition, Oxford University, 2011

 

Letter to Cassandra–Sunday 18 September 1796–Doubt & Deliberation

Jane Austen begins her letter from Rowling to her older sister Cassandra home in Steventon with this bit of news: “This morning has been spent in Doubt & Deliberation; in forming plans, and removing Difficulties, for it ushered in the Day with an Event which I had not intended should take place so soon for a week.”

In this letter, there was both good and bad news to relay to Cassandra.  Their brother Frank had received an appointment to a ship, and therefore, the delay/difficulties were in the scheduling of Frank escorting Jane Austen to her next destination.  Per Austen’s post script and the notes the ship Frank was newly assigned to was a frigate called the Triton.

Austen in leaving Rowling, was supposed to travel for a visit with Mary Pearson and her family, before they would leave together for Stevenson, but leaving Rowling early via Frank was an issue. Austen was not sure this would line up with the Pearson’s schedule, and there was an issue on confirming this change: “I wrote to Miss P — on friday, & hoped to receive an answer from her this morning, which would have rendered everything smooth & easy, and would have enabled us to leave this place tomorrow, as Frank on first receiving his Appointment to do so.”

Seems Austen did not hear back from Miss Mary Pearson and plans as she continued to write/describe were unsettled.  Per the notes, Mary was the eldest daughter of Captain Sir Richardson Pearson of the British Royal Navy, Lt. Governor of the Greenwich Hospital for Seaman.

Austen indulges here in a bit of her wicked wit with a bit of a confidence to her sister, “If Miss Pearson should return with me, pray be careful not to expect too much Beauty.”  And following with a little bit of a snarky reference to Mrs. Austen as well, “My Mother I am sure will be disappointed, if she does not take great care.”

Austen relays that her brother Frank had to change things around, “He remains till Wednesday merely to accommodate me.”  She adds that she had written to Ms. Pearson again and was trying to see about alternative plans with another brother, “Edward has been so good as to promise to take me to Greenwich the following Monday which was the day before fixed on, if that suits them better–”

And this letter continues: “If I have no answer at all on Tuesday, I must suppose that Mary is not at Home, & must wait till I do hear; as after having invited her to Steventon with me, it will not quite do, to go home and say no more about it.–”

Then noting perhaps Mr. Austen could also assist, “My Father will be so good to fetch home is prodigal Daughter from Town, I hope, unless he wishes me to walk the Hospitals, Enter at the Temple, or mount Guard at St. James.”  Per the notes “walk the Hospitals” is a term meaning to study medicine/become a medical student.

Austen’s tone seems to be light-light hearted and joking, but there does seem to be an underlining concern to confirm plans and prevail one or more of her brothers and father, “It will hardly be in Frank’s power to take me home; nay, it certainly will not. I shall write again as soon as I to Greenwich.”

Seems to be anxious awaiting from Miss Pearson relaying to Cassandra alternative plans proposed and shot down by her brothers.  Apparently Austen felt bad the letter was dominated by scheduling issues and schemes she did include this one other tidbit of news: ‘Mary is brought to bed of a Boy; both doing very well.  I shall leave you to guess what Mary I mean–”  Per the notes this is presumed a reference to Mary Robinson a maidservant at Rowling.  So perhaps this was a bit of gossip and Austen was a bit guilty to indulge for she closed the letter with, “How ill I have written. I begin to hate myself.”

All notes/cites to: Jane Austen’s Letters, Fourth Edition, Collected and Edited by Deirdre LeFaye, Oxford University Press 2011.

 

Joan Vredenburgh at JASNA, Mass., May 21, 2017

Today, attended an interesting meeting hosted by Mass. Chapter of JASNA, featuring a lecture by Joan Vredenburgh, who teaches at the Naval Academy Preparatory School (NAPS) in Newport, RI.  Her talk today focused and explored the perceptions of the different military branches, Army, Navy, and Marines during the Regency Era in England and connections/references in Austen’s novels. Enjoyed her talk very much, and on a somewhat different note — today was speaking to a colleague — a U.S. Navy veteran — he said that they cannot use blue ink, only black ink and officers must use red ink.  Found that really captivating and had to share!